The Appraiser’s home inspection is a painless process that can be made even easier if you do a bit of preparation. An experienced Appraiser will know the basic characteristics of your home before arriving, but there are things that you can do to help us out further.

Remodeling or Updating

When an Appraiser conducts a home inspection, he/she will note what he/she sees. However, we are only human and at times we can miss something. Producing an itemized list of any remodeling or updating that you or a previous owner may have performed will help the Appraiser know exactly what to look for.

In addition, there are certain things that we cannot see from a typical interior inspection. Has your home been recently re-wired or updated to copper plumbing? These aren’t things that are readily apparent and knowledge of them helps the Appraiser to reach the most accurate opinion of value.


Does your home have any legal additions? Often times, the public records will not reflect recent additions of gross living area or room count of your home. It’s never fun for an Appraiser to draw up a sketch of your home only to find that it is much larger then records indicate.

If you have an addition, let your Appraiser know. If you have the permits available, also give him/her a copy. It saves your Appraiser a trip down to the county assessors office.

Future Remodeling or Updates

If you are in the middle of a home restoration or remodeling project, often times an Appraisal will be contingent on the completion of the repairs. What this means is that upon completion of the Appraisal, the value is not what your home is worth, rather, it is what your home will be worth once your renovations are completed. To make the Appraiser’s life easier and to ensure a more accurate opinion of value, provide a list of all renovations or remodeling that you will be doing.

Remember, once those renovations are complete, the Appraiser will need to return to your home in order to verify they have been completed as described.


If you have any encroachments or easements on your property, it is important to let the Appraiser know as these are not always readily apparent.

Some other tips:

Dogs and Other Animals

If you are the owner of dogs or any other large animals, all Appraiser’s will appreciate if you lock them up during the home inspection. Most homeowners will ensure the Appraiser that their dogs are harmless and would never attack anyone, but why take the risk?


An Appraiser is required to inspect all accessible areas of a property without putting him/herself in harms way. If there are large parts of your property or home that are inaccessible for some reason or another, it could potentially have a negative effect on the overall value.


Most Appraisers enter hundreds of homes each year so there is very little that can surprise an experienced Appraiser. When it comes to untidy homes, most Appraisers can see past it. If your home is extremely dirty or over-cluttered, this will factor in the overall value in the Appraisal report. Do yourself a favor and tidy up a bit before the home inspection.

The home inspection is a simple thing that should not take very much time out of your day. Help to make things go more smoothly and painlessly by preparing before the Appraiser enters your home.